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Infusion beers explained

This past week, our taproom rolled out two infused beers. Our flagship Saison is currently infused with blackberry sage green tea. Ten, our Belgian-style Quadruple Ale, is being infused with cinnamon and cacao.

 

 

Infusions are a way we can showcase our beers' ability to transform under the introduction of a new flavor. Possibilities are near infinite for these infusions – spices, fruits, vegetables and teas have all been used to infuse our beers. While all of these ingredients can be added to a beer during the brewing process, utilizing a HopRocket to instead augment the flavor allows us to experiment more freely and frequently with different flavors.

Often called a Randall (Dogfish Head Brewery is credited with the invention of the tool under that name), Funkwerks uses a HopRocket made by Blichmann, a brewing engineering company. This stainless steel chamber intercepts the beer flow from keg to tap line, steeping the beer much like tea. Because the infusion happens after the beer has been kegged, the flavor intensity can certainly vary. Intuitively, the infusion flavor is more apparent the longer the beer spends in the flavor chamber.

 

 

Taproom staff take a field trip to downtown Fort Collins to the local tea house and spice shop. Back at the brewery, we fill a large mesh bag with whichever flavor has been selected. This bag is placed inside the HopRocket and attached to the tap line and keg. A short ten to twenty minutes later, a new tasty brew is waiting to be poured for you.

Just as quickly as we're able to hook an infusion up, so can the flavor be changed. Once the infusion flavor begins to weaken, staff refreshes the flavor with either a new batch of the same or an entirely different infusion. Sources have spotted Chai Spice, Thai Chili peppers, peppermint and chocolate rose tea in the office. Stop by the taproom to see which infusion you'll find.